Our editor-in-chief Nate Yapp is proud to have contributed to the new book Hidden Horror: A Celebration of 101 Underrated and Overlooked Fright Flicks, edited by Aaron Christensen. Another contributors include Anthony Timpone, B.J. Colangelo, Dave Alexander, Classic-Horror.com's own Robert C. Ring and John W. Bowen. Pick up a copy today from Amazon.com!

Posts by Tom Fallows

Ed Gein: Pop Star

edgein_0

Texas Chainsaw Massacre Month. I don't know what makes men like Ed Gein superstars, when all they leave behind them is suffering, loss and madness. Maybe it's that their stories are so bizarrely gothic and so filled with lurid details that no movie could make up. Ironically movies about these creatures will later appear - the weird parts repackaged for general consumption. After this we can relax, take a breath and tell ourselves, "Well heck, it's only a movie." When this happens enough, when we've seen the film, read the books and got the pez dispenser, men like Gein become no more real to us than a Leatherface, a Freddy Krueger or King Kong. Soon they have a separate 'star image' and while they still give most of us the chills, for others they are 'anti-heroes' or symbols of rebellion. Perhaps this is the only way we can make life bearable, by fictionalizing them, making fun and denying anything really ever happened. But it did happen and Gein was real. So were his victims.(read more...)

Dennis Hopper: Movie Maniac

Dennis Hopper

For a man who appeared in so few horror pictures, there was always something frightening about Dennis Hopper. As an artist and a man, he seemed to pursue madness. For half his life he lived on a diet of booze and amphetamines, pushing his body to the brink of destruction and inviting stories of a man out of control. There are tales of him pulling knives on co-stars, threats of violence and of him drinking his way into character. Charles Manson saw him as a kindred spirit and begged Hopper to play him onscreen. Look into his eyes on any film following Easy Rider (1968) and they show a man who has stared into the abyss.
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Tom Atkins ("Night of the Creeps") Interview

Tom Atkins

In the 1980s, while muscle bound lunkheads like Stallone and Schwarzenegger were battling the forces of darkness with lame quips and a minor armory at their disposal, one man was doing it with nothing more a carton of cigarettes and a six-pack of beer. With his blue collar charm and everyman exterior, Tom Atkins became something of a minor league hero in some of the decade's favorite cult movies. He took on ghostly pirates in John Carpenter's The Fog (1980), an occult madman in Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982) and a zombified lawman in Maniac Cop (1988).(read more...)

Gary Sherman ("Death Line") Interview

Gary Sherman

Gary Sherman never wanted to direct horror movies. But like all filmmakers who are perhaps a little too good at what they do, he got stuck in a particular genre's tangled web. Sherman is, of course, the man behind such cult classics as the London Underground-set Death Line and the Ron Shusett & Dan O'Bannon (of Alien fame) penned Dead & Buried. Both films displayed an eerie, slow-burning approach to horror that left fans in little doubt that he was one of the genre's true masters. But despite directing the extreme violence of Vice Squad, the ill-fated Poltergeist III (one of the last films to use entirely in-camera special effects), and the DV cam serial killer flick 39: A Film by Carroll McKane, Master of Horror was a mantle Sherman didn't want. Here he talks to Classic-Horror about his involvement with the genre, and his long standing desire to finally break free of it.(read more...)

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