Our editor-in-chief Nate Yapp is proud to have contributed to the new book Hidden Horror: A Celebration of 101 Underrated and Overlooked Fright Flicks, edited by Aaron Christensen. Another contributors include Anthony Timpone, B.J. Colangelo, Dave Alexander, Classic-Horror.com's own Robert C. Ring and John W. Bowen. Pick up a copy today from Amazon.com!

Tags: the invisible man

Over at the Sci-Fi Block: Nate and Robert Discuss "The Invisible Man" on the SFB Podcast

The Invisible Man 1933 poster

A few months ago, Robert Ring (editor-in-chief of The Sci-Fi Block and a Classic-Horror contributing writer) and I fired up our respective Skypes to record a lengthy discussion on the merits of one of my favorite films, James Whale's The Invisible Man. Now that conversation has been posted online for all to hear. I had a lot of fun doing the podcast, especially in support of what I consider to be a sister site to Classic-Horror.com. Give it a listen, if only to hear me do an atrocious impersonation of Boris Karloff. 

Also, while you're there, take a gander at the Block's new design, whipped up by yours truly. 

Universal's "The Invisible Man" Joins National Film Registry

The Invisible Man 1933 poster

Every year, the Library of Congress chooses twenty-five films that are "culturally, historically or aesthetically" significant to be preserved in the National Film Registry. This year's selections, announced today, are a varied lot, ranging from comedies (So's Your Man) to film-noir (The Asphalt Jungle) to satirical dramas (A Face in the Crowd). Significant to genre aficionados is the inclusion of James Whale's 1933 sci-fi/horror romp The Invisible Man (1933). One of my favorites of Universal's golden age, the movie follows the transparent Dr.(read more...)

Tribute Video: Universal Monsters

Universal Monsters vid banner

Under my vidder alias "Jetpack Monkey", I recently created a fanvid for Universal's classic monster movies, set to Rob Thomas's "Ever the Same." I chose the song because I wanted something modern and poppy to create a juxtaposition with the Gothic imagery (in point of fact, I really kind of hate the song). I've embedded it below.

If you have trouble viewing the video on Classic-Horror, it is also available as a 26MB Quicktime file (right-click the link and select "Save as..." from the menu).(read more...)

David S. Goyer Takes On "The Invisible Man"

Variety.com reports that Universal and Imagine Entertainment have hired David S. Goyer (Blade: Trinity, The Invisible) to write and direct a new adaptation/sequel to H.G. Wells' classic novel "The Invisible Man." The film would follow the nephew of the original Invisible Man as he uses his uncle's invisibility formula to aid British intelligence during WWII (thus giving the plot some resemblance to 1942's Invisible Agent). Regarding the project, Goyer said, "I've always been a fan of the original H.G. Wells book as well as the Universal film and felt the property was ripe for reimagining." Brian Grazer (A Beautiful Mind) will produce the film. Universal previously produced a string of Invisible Man movies in the 1930s and 1940s, starting with James Whale's The Invisible Man (1933).

Universal Terror IV: Invisible Men and Black Cats

Universal logo

In 1933, Universal produced only one horror film. It was The Invisible Man. It was the third horror film directed by James Whale.

The film opens on the snow covered village of Iping. A mysterious stranger (Claude Rains), totally covered with bandages and wearing dark goggles, checks into the Lion's Head Tavern and Inn. Meanwhile in his lab, Dr. Cranley (Henry Travers) is trying to comfort his daughter Flora (Gloria Stuart) about the disappearance of her boyfriend Jack Griffin. Cranley's other assistant Kemp (William Harrigan) tells her of his feelings for her, but he is rejected.(read more...)

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