Our editor-in-chief Nate Yapp is proud to have contributed to the new book Hidden Horror: A Celebration of 101 Underrated and Overlooked Fright Flicks, edited by Aaron Christensen. Another contributors include Anthony Timpone, B.J. Colangelo, Dave Alexander, Classic-Horror.com's own Robert C. Ring and John W. Bowen. Pick up a copy today from Amazon.com!

Tags: lists

Ebert, AFI, and the Dead Teenager Movie

Let me begin by saying that there's a certain irony in the story I'm about to tell. I've spent the last week and a half in defense of the so-called "Dead Teenager Movie". When I started Classic-Horror, eight years back when I was younger and dumber, it was meant as a shining spire of enlightment, broadcasting a message of excellent horror in what I perceived to be a wasteland of Freddy Krueger and Jason Voorhees fansites. My notion of horror on the Internet has changed significantly since then, as has my appreciation of the slasher genre.(read more...)

Death with a Brutal Kick: 10 Sadistic Ways to Die in a Horror Movie

Brutal Feature: Black Sunday 1960

Sometimes, we get contacted to do an article to coincide with the release of a theatrical film or DVD. Most of the time, we don't do it because we either don't have any ideas or there are no good ideas for that particular movie. The PR folks for Universal's recent remake of The Hitcher (coming out on DVD May 1st -- check the cover art at the bottom of the page) had something different, however -- a good idea. They said, "Hey, guys, we have somebody getting yanked apart by two semi trucks in our movie. What about listing off some other brutal and/or sadistic deaths?" I was intrigued, which is often enough to get me to put fingers to keyboard, so here we go.

The list presented below isn't definitive. These aren't necessarily the ten most brutal or sadistic deaths in a horror movie, just the ones we thought were notable. Your mileage may vary. Each entry is accompanied by a screencap that can be accessed by clicking the thumbnail icon below the film title.(read more...)

The 2005 Caligari's Cabinet Awards

Voting in the 2005 Caligari's Cabinet Awards occured between May 10th and June 10th, 2005 and was open to all readers of Classic-Horror. Results were posted June 2005.(read more...)

The 2001 Caligari's Cabinet Awards

It's difficult to believe that we've been running this poll for three years now, but it's true. Every year in that time, dedicated readers have cast their votes for their favorite horror films of all time, and every year we rank 'em as they're called. Voting in this year's Caligari's Cabinet Awards occured between November 1st and December 31st, 2001 and was open to all readers of Classic-Horror.com.

The list never gets any less surprising, either. Sure, there are some titles that have made it every year, but the ones that come and go are what's truly fascinating. For instance, this year, Horror of Dracula, a mainstay of the first and second lists, dropped off into Honorable Mention, while The Beyond, which wasn't even ranked last year, made it into the main list.(read more...)

The 2000 Caligari's Cabinet Awards

Hello, I'm your presenter for the evening, Nate Yapp. We're here to give the final results of the Caligari's Cabinet Awards, taken from a poll that you, the reader, took part in during the months of November and December. Yes, all the greatest horror films are here tonight, in bated breath to see which are "among the best," which are "the cream of the crop," and what is "the greatest horror movie ever made!"(read more...)

The 1999 Caligari's Cabinet Awards

That's right! The votes are in, and some last minute votes brought in a few favorites to the top 10. Voting in the 1st Annual Caligari's Cabinet Awards occurred between November 1st and December 31st, 1999 and was open to all readers of Classic-Horror.

James Whale, George Romero, John Carpenter, Jacques Tourneur, and Sam Raimi each had more than one movie on the top 25. Whale had three (Bride of Frankenstein, Frankenstein, and Old Dark House), the most of any director. Actors figured just as prominently, with Bruce Campbell, Dwight Frye, Boris Karloff, Bela Lugosi, Ernest Thesiger, and Edward Van Sloan garnering at least two films each on the list (Karloff and Frye both had three).(read more...)

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