Our editor-in-chief Nate Yapp is proud to have contributed to the new book Hidden Horror: A Celebration of 101 Underrated and Overlooked Fright Flicks, edited by Aaron Christensen. Another contributors include Anthony Timpone, B.J. Colangelo, Dave Alexander, Classic-Horror.com's own Robert C. Ring and John W. Bowen. Pick up a copy today from Amazon.com!

Tags: theme weeks

Welcome to Godzilla Week

Godzilla / Gojira

Here he comes, the King of Monsters, one of the great pop culture icons of all time, the one and only Godzilla. This giant lizard has been stomping around for the past fifty-five years, variably as villain, hero, and antihero. He's faced dozens of other monsters, from the benevolent Mothra to the world-conqueror King Ghidorah. He's been the subject of cartoons, pop songs, and a metric ton of collectible toys. This week, Classic-Horror.com has teamed up with The Sci-Fi Block to honor the big guy with a week of reviews. Each day this week, Monday through Friday, we'll post a new Godzilla review here at Classic-Horror, and a different review of the same film will go up over at SFB.

Monday, May 18th: Godzilla 2000 (1999) -- Classic-Horror review / Sci-Fi Block review

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Theme Week: Reader's Choice

Back in December, we asked our readers to tell us which movies they'd like to see us review. We received a good number of responses and now, three months later, we've completed reviews for five of the requested movies. Which flicks made the final cut? You'll have to keep your eye on Classic-Horror for the next five days in order to find out. We'll be unveiling one title a day this week, starting Monday, March 9th and running through Friday, March 13th.(read more...)

Theme Week: "Are You My Mummy?"

Mummy Week

It's time for another good ol' tried-and-true theme week. Five days, five reviews. This time around, we tackle the ancient Egyptian (and occasionally Mayan) menace, the mummy. Swathed in bandages, he roams the desert (or countryside or swamp or whatever) killing anyone who disturbs his tomb (or steals his treasure or absconds with his beloved princess or uses the phrase "Do the needful").(read more...)

David Cronenberg Week

David Cronenberg on the set of Videodrome

Maybe it was merely coincidence that three of our writers were all working on reviews of films directed by David Cronenberg at the same time, but we could hardly ignore it. If we're thinking about Canada's King of Veneral Horror right now, it's equally likely that you are, too. It's not surprising that he's in our heads right now, since he has a way of sticking there. The myriad of bizarre themes in his films -- the body politic, the melding of man and technology, and the conspiracy of/against society, among others -- are like viruses that subtly infect our brain cells, making residence and changing how we view the world. Even though Cronenberg has moved on to the more Oscar-friendly pastures of the crime drama in A History of Violence and Eastern Promises, the legacy of horror he has left in films like Shivers, Videodrome, and The Fly (1986) continue to shock audiences at both the visceral and intellectual levels.(read more...)

Yuletide Terror: Deck the Halls with Horror Reviews

Silent Night Deadly Night poster

As December 25th draws near, we decided to add a little more red to the holiday season with five reviews of Christmas-related horror films. Appropriately (or inappropriately, if you will), three of them involve killer Santas.(read more...)

Shocktober 2007: Mario Bava Week

Shocktober 2007: Mario Bava

Each week in October this year, as part of our Shocktober Classics event, we'll be featuring a different director who has significantly contributed to the horror genre, with new reviews for that director's films from Monday to Friday of that week. For our final celebration, we look at the Italian Maestro of the Macabre, Mario Bava.(read more...)

Shocktober 2007: Lucio Fulci Week

Shocktober 2007: Lucio Fulci

Each week in October this year, as part of our Shocktober Classics event, we'll be featuring a different director who has significantly contributed to the horror genre, with new reviews for that director's films from Monday to Friday of that week. For the third week of October, we turn our gaze to Lucio Fulci, popularly referred to as "The Godfather of Gore."

Fulci began his film career working as a screenwriter before graduating to director with the Toto comedy I Ladri (The Thieves) in 1959. Although he filmed movies of many different genres throughout his 32-year career, he is best known for his horror films. His early efforts in the genre (including 1969's Perversion Story, 1971's A Lizard in a Woman's Skin, and 1972's Don't Torture a Duckling) were frequently mystery-thrillers in the giallo tradition, with only the occasional use of gore effects.(read more...)

Shocktober 2007: Wes Craven Week

Shocktober 2007: Wes Craven

Each week in October this year, as part of our Shocktober Classics event, we'll be featuring a different director who has significantly contributed to the horror genre, with new reviews for that director's films from Monday to Friday of that week. Our next master, Wes Craven, probably needs no introduction. Instead, we'll be posting a full biography for him in our Masters section on Saturday, October 12th. It should be sufficient to note that Craven has directed a number of the best and best-known horror films, including Last House on the Left, The Hills Have Eyes, A Nightmare on Elm Street, and Scream.

Shocktober Craven Week Reviews:(read more...)

Shocktober 2007: Roger Corman Week

Shocktober 2007: Roger Corman

Each week in October this year, as part of our Shocktober Classics event, we'll be featuring a different director who has significantly contributed to the horror genre, with new reviews for that director's films from Monday to Friday of that week.

The schedule for the month is as follows:

Week of October 1st: Roger Corman
Week of October 8th: Wes Craven
Week of October 15th: Lucio Fulci
Week of October 22nd: Mario Bava
Week of October 29th: Mario Bava continued (through the 31st)

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Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde Week

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde 1931 poster

“He is not easy to describe. There is something wrong with his appearance; something displeasing, something downright detestable. I never saw a man I so disliked, and yet I scarce know why. He must be deformed somewhere; he gives a strong feeling of deformity, although I couldn’t specify the point. He’s an extraordinary-looking man, and yet I really can name nothing out of the way. No, sir; I can make no hand of it; I can’t describe him. And it’s not want of memory; for I declare I can see him this moment.”

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