Our editor-in-chief Nate Yapp is proud to have contributed to the new book Hidden Horror: A Celebration of 101 Underrated and Overlooked Fright Flicks, edited by Aaron Christensen. Another contributors include Anthony Timpone, B.J. Colangelo, Dave Alexander, Classic-Horror.com's own Robert C. Ring and John W. Bowen. Pick up a copy today from Amazon.com!

Haunted Newsreel

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Chris Costello Interview

Chris Costello

Chris Costello, the youngest daughter of Lou Costello of the comedy team Abbott and Costello, is most well known for her biography of her father "Lou’s on First." This wonderfully touching biography of her talented father has been in print for over 20 years. I got the pleasure to interview this absolutely marvelous woman who gave the readers of Classic-Horror a very lovely tribute to her father and the history of the Abbott and Costello monster movies.(read more...)

Lloyd Kaufman Interview

Lloyd Kaufman

The man you're about to read about is utterly insane... or so he seems. The President of Troma Films and the creator of the Toxic Avenger (as he is often introduced) is very much as he appears in the numerous vignettes of Troma's Edge TV (found on finer Troma DVDs everywhere) - and yet has a deeper core of wild insight into classic film, Corporate America, and New York's Finest.

I had the honor and privilege of conversing with Lloyd early in August of 2002, right in the middle of his hectic schedule. I should have known I was in for a treat when Lloyd broke traditional interviewing technique and asked me the first question...

Lloyd Kaufman: Where are you, by the way?

Classic-Horror: I'm in Iowa.

(read more...)

The 2001 Caligari's Cabinet Awards

It's difficult to believe that we've been running this poll for three years now, but it's true. Every year in that time, dedicated readers have cast their votes for their favorite horror films of all time, and every year we rank 'em as they're called. Voting in this year's Caligari's Cabinet Awards occured between November 1st and December 31st, 2001 and was open to all readers of Classic-Horror.com.

The list never gets any less surprising, either. Sure, there are some titles that have made it every year, but the ones that come and go are what's truly fascinating. For instance, this year, Horror of Dracula, a mainstay of the first and second lists, dropped off into Honorable Mention, while The Beyond, which wasn't even ranked last year, made it into the main list.(read more...)

Hammer, We Hardly Knew Ye

I’m sure all you boils and ghouls remember the very first time you saw Peter Cushing swing across the screen in Brides of Dracula. Perhaps, you felt a twinge in your stomach when you saw Christopher Lee show his fangs for the first time in Horror of Dracula. Or maybe you just couldn’t help to be swept into the atmosphere of The Hound of the Baskervilles. Regardless, there is a certain feeling you expect to generate while watching the typical Hammer horror. To the classic horror fan, Hammer is to horror as plastic is the Michael Jackson’s nose. However, there is a whole other side the Hammer in which few classic horror fans venture to.(read more...)

Universal Terror VIII: "Son of Frankenstein" and Beyond

Son of Frankenstein publicity photo

In 1938, in an attempt to gain profits, Universal re-released Dracula and Frankenstein. The gamble paid off; the re-releases were extremely popular. Universal then decided to make a third Frankenstein film. In 1939, Son of Frankenstein was made. Henry Frankenstein's son Wolf von Frankenstein (Basil Rathbone) returns to his ancestral village to claim his inheritance. Wolf, his wife Elsa (Josephine Hutchinson), and his son Peter (Donnie Dugan) are not welcomed by the villagers. The villagers remember his father's monster and the damage it did.(read more...)

Universal Terror VII: The New Universal

Universal logo (New Universal)

The Raven was the last horror film to be produced under the Laemmle dynasty of Universal. 1936 would be a year of great upheaval for the studio. In 1936, the studio hit very hard times, yet friends and relatives of the Laemmle family still took home top salaries. The stock holders became angry and voted the Laemmles out. After Carl Laemmle's family was removed, Universal became known as the "New Universal". (read more...)

Universal Terror VI: Werewolves and Ravens

Universal logo

Universal studio's next horror film after Bride of Frankenstein was Werewolf of London, directed by Stuart Walker. The film was the first film dealing with Lycanthropy made by a major studio. The film follows Dr. Glendon (Henry Hull), who is bitten by a strange animal while in Tibet. In Tibet, he obtains the mariphasa lupina, a flower which only blooms under the moon. When Dr. Glendon returns to England the mysterious Dr. Yogami (Warner Oland) warns him that there are two werewolves in London right now. Yogami tells Glendon that the mariphasa is the only known cure for werewolfism. Dr, Yogami also warns him that a werewolf, instinctively kills what he loves the most.(read more...)

Universal Terror V: "Bride of Frankenstein"

Bride of Frankenstein 1935 poster

In 1935, Universal Studios made their next horror spectacular, the sequel to Frankenstein titled Bride of Frankenstein. It is considered by many to be the greatest horror film ever produced by Universal. A prologue featuring Mary Shelley (Elsa Lanchester), Percy Shelley (Douglas Walton), and Lord Byron (Gavin Gordon) starts the film. The story picks up right at the end of Frankenstein, at the burning windmill. Henry Frankenstein (Colin Clive) is brought back to Frankenstein manor and the monster (Boris Karloff) climbs from the ashes of the windmill.(read more...)

Universal Terror IV: Invisible Men and Black Cats

Universal logo

In 1933, Universal produced only one horror film. It was The Invisible Man. It was the third horror film directed by James Whale.

The film opens on the snow covered village of Iping. A mysterious stranger (Claude Rains), totally covered with bandages and wearing dark goggles, checks into the Lion's Head Tavern and Inn. Meanwhile in his lab, Dr. Cranley (Henry Travers) is trying to comfort his daughter Flora (Gloria Stuart) about the disappearance of her boyfriend Jack Griffin. Cranley's other assistant Kemp (William Harrigan) tells her of his feelings for her, but he is rejected.(read more...)

Fritz the Nite Owl Interview

Fritz the Nite Owl

In my article on late nite horror shows and their hosts, I used a local creature feature, Chiller Theatre from Channel 13, in my illustration because it is most typical of the shows we all remember. It was, however, another show and its host that is truly responsible for my love of horror and my fondess for late-nite TV scare fests. The show was Nite Owl Theatre and the man behind it is the one and only Fritz the Nite Owl.(read more...)

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