Our editor-in-chief Nate Yapp is proud to have contributed to the new book Hidden Horror: A Celebration of 101 Underrated and Overlooked Fright Flicks, edited by Aaron Christensen. Another contributors include Anthony Timpone, B.J. Colangelo, Dave Alexander, Classic-Horror.com's own Robert C. Ring and John W. Bowen. Pick up a copy today from Amazon.com!

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Cold Reads: Lullaby by Chuck Palahniuk

Lullaby by Chuck Palahniuk

Lullaby is by no means a conventional horror novel. Then again, Chuck Palahniuk is by no means a conventional horror novelist. Hell, Palahniuk isn't even a conventional writer. While these factors may seem to be detriments to the success of the book, Palahniuk's novel accomplishes something that hardly seems possible in the world of horror today: he has developed a completely new, unique, and refreshing idea. Lullaby deserves to go down in the annals of the best psychological/satirical/horror novels, however small said annals may be.(read more...)

Tribute Video: A Nightmare on Elm Street series - Legends Never Die

Freddy in shadow

Horror may be my primary obsession, but it is by no means my only one. I've also taken to creating fanvids, which you can sort of think of as visual remixes of movies or television set to popular music (examples of my work can be found here, here, and here). Generally speaking, the friends I've made in the vidding community are separate from the ones I've made in the horror community, but sometimes there's a crossover which gives me great joy. The fanvid I'm presenting now involves one such crossover.

Eunice is a friend whose interests tend to run fairly parallel to my own, even though she's a much more talented vidder than I am. In her latest creation, set to the Plasmatics' "Legends Never Die," she explores the mythos of Freddy Krueger, from the Nightmare on Elm Street series. Of particular note is the way that she firmly reasserts Freddy as the spectral force of evil that he stopped being around the third or fourth film. You can see the vid after the jump.(read more...)

Cold Reads: A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner

Rose on a Grave by JoX1989

Dark and dirty things occur in the Deep South at the dead of night, while the crickets are a-chirping and the big ol' devil moon is smiling down at the earth. I apologize for the folksy intro, but after reading "A Rose for Emily" by William Faulkner, I can't help but get in the moonshine spirit of things. If the bizarre effect the tale had on me isn't testament enough, I can personally assure you that Faulkner's prose will have you convinced that his town of Jefferson, Mississippi is as real as your own childhood home.(read more...)

The Fruit Cellar: From Body Horror to Identity Horror

Dead Ringers publicity still

Of his 1988 film Dead Ringers, David Cronenberg said, "It has to do with that element of being human. It has to do with that ineffable sadness that is an element of human existence." This statement is entirely true. His film manages to simultaneously question and confirm the humanity and weaknesses of its central characters; however, Cronenberg's assessment of his own film is surprisingly reductive. Upon closer investigation, Dead Ringers seems to be about so much more. It's a complicated discussion of identity-how we come to understand ourselves, what defines us, and ultimately, what destroys us.(read more...)

Cold Reads: Hellboy: Seed of Destruction by Mike Mignola and John Byrne

Hellboy Seed of Destruction

Here in the grim library section of Classic-Horror.com, I have thus far delved into written works of fiction both short and long. It is my mission to discuss varying mediums of the written word, everything from novels, plays, and comic books. This week's selection is the first in one of my mad experiments in the realm of the graphic arts.

Hellboy is somewhat of a cultural phenomenon. Starting out as a mere sketch by artist Mike Mignola, the character has developed and changed over the years since that first conception. Hellboy is now a force in the comic book industry to be reckoned with and one of the luminaries of the fabulous comic book company Dark Horse. Being no stranger to graphic novels, I eagerly awaited for the moment I could begin reading Hellboy: Seed of Destruction. As a fan of horror and comic books, I was sufficiently rewarded.(read more...)

Terror on Youtube: Stephen Fry's Dracula

Stephen Fry in "The Letter"

One of my favorite comedians is Stephen Fry, for his work on the sketch show A Bit of Fry and Laurie as well as the eternally amusing quiz program QI. So it was with much glee that I discovered a little nugget entitled "The Letter", which reveals that Fry had done some work in the horror genre during his time with Cambridge Footlights. Check it out after the cut.(read more...)

Cold Reads: The Monkey's Paw by W.W. Jacobs

The Monkey's Paw by W.W. Jacobs

Gather around, everyone. I have a tale to tell you. It may shock you. It might even horrify you. But fear not, my dear readers. We have the safety of the crackling fire and the roof over our heads to protect us from the night's terrible wrath. You may have heard this story before. Perhaps from a family member or a friend of a friend. For those of you who have yet to hear this little shocker, you may wish you never had...(read more...)

Over at the Sci-Fi Block: Nate and Robert Discuss "The Invisible Man" on the SFB Podcast

The Invisible Man 1933 poster

A few months ago, Robert Ring (editor-in-chief of The Sci-Fi Block and a Classic-Horror contributing writer) and I fired up our respective Skypes to record a lengthy discussion on the merits of one of my favorite films, James Whale's The Invisible Man. Now that conversation has been posted online for all to hear. I had a lot of fun doing the podcast, especially in support of what I consider to be a sister site to Classic-Horror.com. Give it a listen, if only to hear me do an atrocious impersonation of Boris Karloff. 

Also, while you're there, take a gander at the Block's new design, whipped up by yours truly. 

"One Cute Motherf**ker": Homosexuality and the Threat of AIDS in John McTiernan’s Predator

Predator (1987): Macho Men: Front row (L to R): Blain, Dutch, Dillon, Poncho; Back row: Hawkins, Mac, Billy

It is common knowledge that the main marketing demographic for action films is the (heterosexual) male moviegoer.  Arguably, John McTiernan's 1987 action-filled, sci-fi horror blockbuster, Predator, is one of the most testosterone-driven features in cinematic history.  Not only is this retelling of Richard Connell's "The Most Dangerous Game" fraught with many of the genre's trademarks -- hyperkinetic movement and pacing, rampant masochism, violent death, and a plethora of gunfire -- it contains only one female performance.  Alongside such works as McTiernan's own Die Hard, Zach Snyder's 300, John Boorman's Deliverance, Don Siegel's Dirty Harry, David Fincher's Fight Club, Ted Kotcheff's First Blood, Ridley Scott's Gladiator, Quentin Tarantino's Reservoir Dogs, and James Cameron's Terminator 2: Judgment Day, Predator is often considered the arche(read more...)

Cold Reads: Red Shadows by Robert E. Howard

Red Shadows (Weird Tales cover)

See the swashbuckling hero smite out evil with the blade of his holy sword! Witness the evil doings of nefarious French criminals and diabolical African warlords! Shiver at the sight of the dead returning from their graves to the beat of voodoo drums as they shamble forth into the mysterious void of the night world! All these thrilling adventures await you in Robert E. Howard's tale of vengeance and bare-chested action that succeeds in both boiling the blood and chilling the flesh.(read more...)

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